3DHEALS Community Manager Interview: Irene Healey, Toronto, Canada

“I think it is important to mix people working in healthcare who have a lot of clinical experience, but limited knowledge of some of the new manufacturing technologies, with those who have an expertise in 3D printing as well as 3D scanning imaging and virtual and augmented reality.

 

 

 

 

 

Community: Toronto, CA

3DHEALS members can get in touch with: Irene Healey here

Jenny: One quote that represents you.

Irene: If you do something, do it well.

Jenny: Tell us a little about yourself. (Where are you from originally? Where are you located? What are you working on?)

Irene: I work in both Canada and the USA and have an interest in how one makes things.

Jenny: What made you decide to become a 3DHEALS community manager?

Irene: Being a 3DHEALS community manager is a great way to reach out and meet new people and bring people together around a common interest.

Jenny: What do you think of innovations in healthcare 3D printing or bioprinting? What do you hope to see in the next five years? 10 years?

Irene: I think the applications of 3D printing in healthcare are just beginning and as technologies evolve we have exciting opportunities.

Jenny: If you have done 3D printing before, what have you made/designed? (Photos if available, preferably in healthcare application)

Irene: I use 3D printing in the production of soft tissue prostheses and have used 3D printing for some finished devices. (see photo)

Jenny: Most of our community managers are entrepreneurial and adventurous, what risks/adventures have you taken that you’d like to share with us? Any hopes or regrets?

Irene: Doing anything new (particularly when self-funded) always has risks but one learns a lot and there are no regrets.

Jenny: Who would you like to find and to include in the 3DHEALS community you are building?

Irene: I think it is important to mix people working in healthcare who have a lot of clinical experience, but limited knowledge of some of the new manufacturing technologies, with those who have an expertise in 3D printing as well as 3D scanning imaging and virtual and augmented reality.

Jenny: What would you like to accomplish with this new 3DHEALS community in the future?

Irene: I would like it to become a resource for the Toronto community.

Jenny: What do you think about the innovation environment (for health tech or for general technology) in your city? What can be done to improve it?

Irene: Toronto is a very expensive city in which to do actual manufacturing as those spaces are disappearing. I think bringing people together to create a dialogue regarding the future of innovation and what that innovation looks like will hopefully be a part of what 3DHEALS facilitates in this city.

Jenny: What are you most proud of about your city?

Irene: I am proud of Toronto’s diversity and the large pool of talented people in close proximity to one another.

Jenny: What are you most proud of about the innovation community in your city?

Irene: I am proud about what people can accomplish in a relatively small economy due to Canada’s small population.

Jenny: What do you think are the top priorities in healthcare innovations for your city/community?

Irene: I think healthcare innovation in Canada is challenging due to how our healthcare system is organized and the first step is recognizing what those challenges are.

Jenny: What do you hope to accomplish through your role as the 3DHEALS community manager?

Irene: I hope to work with others to create something of value for the community.

Jenny: What do you do for fun?

Irene: Cycling.

 

 

 

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